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Library Conventions

Exhibition by ImageAcess

United States

ImageAccess usa office

Europe

ImageAccess europe office

Company History

Our experience in digitization of printed materials dates back to 1988 prior to its founding in 1993, when Image Access began providing digitization workflow solutions to commercial markets. Having developed its own book and wide format scanners as well as its own OCR, barcode reading and image treatment algorithms and a powerful workflow system, Image Access is well-equipped to meet both general and specialized digitization needs.

Image Access has a long history of leadership in digital technology. Image Access created Scan2Net®, the first Ethernet/HTML based scanner interface, the first self-serve book scanner kiosk, the first and only ILL scan, clean-up and delivery workflow system, the first affordable preservation quality large format planetary scanner, the first affordable duplex newspaper scanner, the first and only book scanner with both flat and v-modes, the first and only complete digitization workflow system, and more. We also have the most extensive and prestigious customer list for book scanners in the United States and many countries abroad.

Image Access created the Digital Library Systems Group (DLSG) in 2004 to focus on the special needs of academic, research and public libraries. And just as Bookeye quickly became the leading book scanner, DLSG quickly became the leading supplier of hybrid library products in America, helping the most prestigious libraries across America become Digital Age Libraries.

Image Access has by far, the most complete lineup of self-serve book scanners (KIC), the only complete turnkey digitization workflow system for creating digital assets and archiving (Opus), and the only complete interlibrary loan scanning and image treatment workflow system (BSCAN ILL). Image Access handily succeeds at its ongoing mission of providing the best image quality, the most specialized software and the broadest line of digitization products from which a library, archive or museum can choose.